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Smithers Chamber wins BC Chamber of the Year

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Vancouver, May 29, 2017 – The Smithers District Chamber ofCommerce has been named B.C.'s 2017 Chamber of the Year by the BC Chamber ofCommerce.

 

The Chamber of the Year Award, presented by Kubera Payments, isabout encouraging and inspiring organizational excellence. This year's criteriafocused on "one" thing the winning chamber did that set it apart from the goodwork done by all chambers. The Smithers Chamber was recognized by introducing anew, niche program to encourage youth to dream big about becoming anentrepreneur. It was called "the Scoop", and involvedworking with the schoolsto offer an online entrepreneur course supplied business guest lecturers.

To encourage participation and attract youth to take theentrepreneurial journey, the chamber manager and directors invested in the constructionof a fully-equipped mobile ice cream parlour that would serve as the businessthe students could compete to manage, as their own, for the summer. Theywere selected by scoring the most points from a Pitch they made to the "GrizzlyDen" modelled after CBC's Dragon Den.

This program was championed by the chamber in collaboration withvalued community partners and sponsors. It was truly a team effort thatcaptured the imagination of its members and the community. Northwest CommunityCollege lent the expertise of its Carpentry Foundations students, WorkBC andCommunity Futures Nadina provided business plan development and financialguidance and School District 54 managed the on-line course material.

In order to provide the Chamber with funding for the program,Chocolate/ Strawberry and Vanilla sponsors were obtained. The Chamber is proudof the level of engagement from the business community providing funds forbuilding materials and equipment. Thanks to Smithers Lumber Yard, PIR, CreativeNotions, Seabridge Gold, BV Home Center, Eecol Electric, Aqua North Plumbing,Driftwood Electric, All-West Glass, Total Floors and Subway.

Colin Bateman, President of the Smithers Chamber reflected that,"the Smithers Chamber team focusses on tailoring products and services that fitthe needs of the community and serve our number one stakeholders - our members.This project was not achieved as a solo effort but by gathering groups togetherthat could share resources and expertise. The spirit of collaboration is aliveand well in our chamber and our community."

Heather Gallagher, Manager of the Smithers Chamber, said she isconstantly in awe of the incredible work that is done by chambers throughoutthe province and is always inspired by their success stories. "We areabsolutely thrilled to receive this award for our members whose investment inour Chamber allows us to take risks, like this project, to get the jobdone. I'm proud to work with directors who are imaginative, innovativeand supportive of novel initiatives like "the Scoop".

For the SmithersDistrict Chamber of Commerce Community and Business Awards, held in

October, BradleyWellington, the 2016 operator of the Ice Cream Parlour was nominated and wonthe award for Young Entrepreneur of the Year. The Chamber is proud to providethis opportunity for youth. The Parlour will be in operation again this summerby two new entrepreneurial-spirited youths.

 

Last Updated on Friday, 09 June 2017 08:30

Alta Gas has FID

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AltaGas AnnouncesPositive FID on Canada's First West Coast Propane Export Terminal

 

CALGARY,ALBERTA--(Marketwired - Jan. 3, 2017) - AltaGas Ltd. ("AltaGas") (TSX:ALA)announced today that it has reached a positive Final Investment Decision("FID") on its Ridley Island Propane Export Terminal (the "RidleyExport Terminal"), having received approval from federal regulators.AltaGas has executed long-term agreements securing land tenure along with railand marine infrastructure on Ridley Island, and will proceed with theconstruction, ownership and operation of the Ridley Export Terminal.

The Ridley ExportTerminal is expected to be the first propane export facility on Canada's westcoast. The site is near Prince Rupert, British Columbia, on a section of landleased by Ridley Terminals Inc. from the Prince Rupert Port Authority. Thelocational advantage is very short shipping distances to markets in Asia,notably a 10-day shipping time compared to 25-days from the U.S. Gulf Coast.The brownfield site also benefits from excellent railway access and a worldclass marine jetty with deep water access to the Pacific Ocean.

"We areconsulting and working with the First Nations whose traditional territory theRidley Export Terminal is located within," said David Harris, Presidentand CEO of AltaGas. "Collaborating closely with First Nations andcommunities to create sustainable social value is of paramount importance to usand we look forward to a long and mutually beneficial relationship with theFirst Nations in the region."

"The project isa reflection of how we do business in B.C. - balancing environmental protectionwith economic development, creating opportunities and real partnerships withFirst Nations, and putting British Columbians first," said Premier ChristyClark. "This export facility is another promising development for ourprovince, connecting producers in northeast B.C. to markets in Asia."

The Ridley ExportTerminal will be designed to ship 1.2 million tonnes of propane per year and isestimated to cost approximately $450 - $500 million. Along with FID, AltaGaswill be offering a third party the option to take an equity position of up to30 percent in the Ridley Export Terminal.

"Propane exportsoff of Canada's west coast pulls together our vision of offering Canadianproducers a complete energy value chain," said Harris. "Together withour northeast B.C. infrastructure, once the Ridley Export Terminal is built andoperating, we will give producers new access to premium Asian markets for theirpropane."

Based on productionfrom its existing facilities and forecasts from new plants under constructionand in active development, AltaGas anticipates having physical volumes equal toapproximately 50 percent of the 1.2 million tonnes. The remaining 50 percent isslated to be supplied by producers and aggregators in western Canada. AltaGasexpects to underpin at least 40 percent of the Ridley Export Terminalthroughput under tolling arrangements with producers and other suppliers.

As previously announcedon May 24, 2016, AltaGas LPG Limited Partnership entered into a Memorandum ofUnderstanding with Astomos Energy Corporation ("Astomos")contemplating a multi-year agreement, for the purchase of at least 50 percentof the 1.2 million tonnes of propane available to be shipped from the RidleyExport Terminal each year. A definitive agreement has been finalized withAstomos containing the key commercial terms for the sale and purchase of thesevolumes of propane. Commercial discussions with Astomos and several other thirdparty offtakers for further capacity commitments are proceeding.

"Astomos is oneof the largest LPG players in the world providing great access to Asian marketsfor Western Canadian producers," said Harris. "We look forward tomaximizing our relationship with them."

AltaGas began theformal environmental review process in early 2016, which included submission ofthe Environmental Evaluation Document, review and final determination byfederal regulators under terms and conditions that will allow the project toproceed. AltaGas has engaged and worked closely with First Nations throughoutthe process and will continue to do so as it moves forward with the RidleyExport Terminal.

Construction isexpected to begin in early 2017 in compliance with the approval, and willproceed under the self-perform model successfully used by AltaGas to build itsother projects on time and on budget. The Ridley Export Terminal is expected tobe in service by the first quarter of 2019.

The Ridley ExportTerminal will support long-term economic stability in the region through thediversification of products at Ridley Terminals, and employment opportunitiesfor area residents and First Nations. It is estimated that 200 to 250construction workers will be hired during the construction phase and 40 to 50permanent jobs created once the facility is operational. The Ridley ExportTerminal will provide enduring community benefits along with employment andcontracting opportunities during both construction and operations phases.

AltaGas is an energyinfrastructure company with a focus on natural gas, power and regulatedutilities. AltaGas creates value by acquiring, growing and optimizing itsenergy infrastructure, including a focus on clean energy sources. For more informationvisit: www.altagas.ca.

This news releasecontains forward-looking statements. When used in this news release, the words "may","would", "could", "can", "will", "be","intend", "possible", "plan", "develop","anticipate", "target', "believe", "seek", "propose","proceed", "continue", "estimate", "expect",and similar expressions, as they relate to AltaGas or an affiliate of AltaGas,are intended to identify forward-looking statements. In particular, this news releasecontains forward-looking statements with respect to, among other things, theproposed Ridley Export Terminal (including being the first propane exportfacility on Canada's west coast, the construction of the terminal and buildingon time and on budget, alternatives and benefits for producers, access to newmarkets, diversification of products, sources of supply, expected supplyvolumes, relations with First Nations and Astomos, potential for third partyinvestment, facility specifications, processing capacity, handling capability,service area, cost, and timeline for construction and in-service, shippingtimeline, tolling arrangements, offtake arrangements, purchase and sale of LPGfrom the terminal, expansion of trade, and employment opportunities and othercommunity benefits), AltaGas' views with respect to the conditions imposed bythe federal regulators on granting its approval, the quality of Asian markets,Asian demand for clean energy, AltaGas' construction of new plants anddevelopment of new projects, business objectives, expected growth, results ofoperations, performance, business projects and opportunities and financialresults. These statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties andother factors that may cause actual results or events to differ materially fromthose anticipated in such forward-looking statements.
Such statements reflect AltaGas' current views with respect to future eventsbased on certain material factors and assumptions and are subject to certainrisks and uncertainties, including without limitation, changes in market,competition, governmental or regulatory developments, general economicconditions and other factors set out in AltaGas' public disclosure documents.Many factors could cause AltaGas' actual results, performance or achievementsto vary from those described in this news release, including without limitationthose listed above. These factors should not be construed as exhaustive. Shouldone or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should assumptionsunderlying forward-looking statements prove incorrect, actual results may varymaterially from those described in this news release as intended, planned,anticipated, believed, sought, proposed, estimated or expected, and suchforward-looking statements included in, or incorporated by reference in thisnews release, should not be unduly relied upon. Such statements speak only asof the date of this news release. AltaGas does not intend, and does not assumeany obligation, to update these forward-looking statements. The forward-lookingstatements contained in this news release are expressly qualified by thiscautionary statement.

Manager, Smithers District Chamber of Commerce

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

250-847-5072

 

BC Chamber shares key insights into B.C.'s business community

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BC Chamber shares key insights into B.C.'s business community

The BC Chamber hosted the B.C.'s Deputy Ministers on November 9th for a thought-leading dinner event that revealed the results of our province-wide Collective Perspective survey.

Respected Canadian public opinion researcher Bruce Anderson of Abacus Data presented the invaluable insights gleaned from our survey, which garnered a tremendous response from businesses of all sizes, representing every sector of the economy and from every region in the province.

Our members-only event offered guests the opportunity to engage in meaningful discussions and strengthen key relationships with senior government representatives and other B.C. business leaders.

Franchise Regs change in BC

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A Franchises Act and regulations for B.C. have recently been finalized by the provincial government and will come into force on February 1, 2017.

In the meantime, franchisors who operate or intend to operate franchises in B.C. will have time to amend or prepare franchise agreements and franchise disclosure documents (FDDs) that comply with the new requirements.

An FDD must be delivered to every prospective or renewing B.C. franchisee from and after February 1, 2017.

What’s not new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation has many features of the franchise legislation already enacted in the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. These similar features include:

·  All franchises (to be) located in B.C. will be bound by its franchise legislation.

·  Every prospective or renewing franchisee must receive an FDD at least 14 days before signing an initial or renewal franchise agreement (assuming the renewal franchise agreement has any material change to the original document, which is usually the case).

·  If an FDD is not delivered, the franchisee has two years to rescind (terminate) the franchise agreement and receive a return of monies paid under it and potential damages. If an FDD is delivered but has defects, the franchisee has 60 days to rescind. For serious defects, some courts may extend the rescission period to the full two years.

·  In the performance and enforcement of a franchise agreement, the franchisor and franchisee are bound by duties of fair dealing and good faith to each other, in accordance with reasonable commercial standards.

·  Any claim regarding a franchise located in B.C. must be heard by a B.C. court (for example, for a serious misrepresentation made in an FDD or breach of the statutory duty of fair dealing or good faith).

·  A franchisee may not waive any right given to it by the legislation or performance of any obligation of the franchisor under the legislation.

What is new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation does have a number of important features that differ from legislation in all or some of the other provinces. These differences include:

·  The legislation will bind franchises existing in B.C. from February 1, 2017 (no “grandfathering” out of existing franchises, as in other provinces).

·  A wraparound FDD covering all or some of the other provinces bound by franchise legislation may be used, provided it is amended to cover the requirements of the B.C. legislation, including deletion of anything contrary to such legislation.

·  FDDs may be delivered in a broad number of ways: personally, by email or by prepaid courier.

·  A franchisor may require of a prospective franchisee a refundable deposit of up to 20% of the initial franchise fee, a confidentiality agreement and/or an agreement selecting a location and/or a protected territory before delivery of an FDD. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  An arbitration of a dispute relating to a franchise located in B.C. must be heard in B.C. court, according to B.C. rules. Any provision(s) to the contrary in a franchise agreement will be void.

·  “Substantial compliance”: a technical defect in an FDD or statement of material change (SMC) that is not substantive will not bring the FDD or SMC into non-compliance provided the FDD or SMC substantially complies with the act. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  A unique definition of “earnings projection” is included in the regulations for the guidance of franchisors whose FDDs will make such a projection.

·  In addition to requiring a franchisor to attach to its FDDs copies of any guarantee and/or security agreement it will require the franchisee to sign, the regulations call upon the franchisor to disclose its “policies and practices” regarding such requirement(s). This is a requirement unique to B.C.

·  While an FDD must disclose all federal and provincial licensing and registration requirements for the franchised business to be met by the franchisee, with respect to municipal requirements, it only needs to state that the franchisee should make its own inquiries.

·  As an exception to the general “non-waiver” rule above, a franchisee may give an enforceable release in connection with settlement of a dispute with the franchisor.

B.C. case law still to be developed

B.C. will need to develop its own body of franchise case law as and when litigation arises under the new legislation. For an initial period after implementation, the B.C. courts are likely to be strongly influenced by the large body of franchise case law of the province of Ontario, as it has developed over the past 16 years since the Arthur Wishart Act (Franchise Disclosure, 2000) became law there. In many ways, Ontario case law favours franchisees; the Ontario Court of Appeal has stated that “the [Ontario] Act is designed to protect franchisees and is to be given a broad interpretation in that regard.” Ontario courts and courts of the other regulated provinces have deemed franchise legislation to be akin to “consumer protection legislation” with the franchisee seen as the consumer.

However, when it comes to arbitration of a franchise dispute, only the B.C. legislation requires the arbitration to be heard in B.C., applying the B.C. law of arbitration, despite any franchise agreement provision to the contrary.

The B.C. advantage

Six of the 10 provinces of Canada now have franchise legislation. B.C. has taken advantage of being the sixth in considering adoption of, changes to and additions to legislation already existing in the other regulated provinces before enacting the B.C. Franchises Act and regulations, which may now be the most progressive legislation in the field of franchising in Canada.

John L. Rogers is a franchise lawyer with Clark Wilson LLP in Vancouver. He practised franchise law for eight years in Toronto, where he became familiar with franchise legislation in Ontario and four other regulated provinces. He has prepared numerous franchise disclosure documents for various provinces. Contact him at 604-891-7758 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Join B.C.'s New Franchise Legislation -- Time to Comply panel discussion on November 30, 2016 to learn how to navigate the new rules taking effect. Are you prepared? For more information, visit www.biv.com/timetocomply .

A Franchises Act and regulations for B.C. have recently been finalized by the provincial government and will come into force on February 1, 2017.

In the meantime, franchisors who operate or intend to operate franchises in B.C. will have time to amend or prepare franchise agreements and franchise disclosure documents (FDDs) that comply with the new requirements.

An FDD must be delivered to every prospective or renewing B.C. franchisee from and after February 1, 2017.

What’s not new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation has many features of the franchise legislation already enacted in the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. These similar features include:

·  All franchises (to be) located in B.C. will be bound by its franchise legislation.

·  Every prospective or renewing franchisee must receive an FDD at least 14 days before signing an initial or renewal franchise agreement (assuming the renewal franchise agreement has any material change to the original document, which is usually the case).

·  If an FDD is not delivered, the franchisee has two years to rescind (terminate) the franchise agreement and receive a return of monies paid under it and potential damages. If an FDD is delivered but has defects, the franchisee has 60 days to rescind. For serious defects, some courts may extend the rescission period to the full two years.

·  In the performance and enforcement of a franchise agreement, the franchisor and franchisee are bound by duties of fair dealing and good faith to each other, in accordance with reasonable commercial standards.

·  Any claim regarding a franchise located in B.C. must be heard by a B.C. court (for example, for a serious misrepresentation made in an FDD or breach of the statutory duty of fair dealing or good faith).

·  A franchisee may not waive any right given to it by the legislation or performance of any obligation of the franchisor under the legislation.

What is new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation does have a number of important features that differ from legislation in all or some of the other provinces. These differences include:

·  The legislation will bind franchises existing in B.C. from February 1, 2017 (no “grandfathering” out of existing franchises, as in other provinces).

·  A wraparound FDD covering all or some of the other provinces bound by franchise legislation may be used, provided it is amended to cover the requirements of the B.C. legislation, including deletion of anything contrary to such legislation.

·  FDDs may be delivered in a broad number of ways: personally, by email or by prepaid courier.

·  A franchisor may require of a prospective franchisee a refundable deposit of up to 20% of the initial franchise fee, a confidentiality agreement and/or an agreement selecting a location and/or a protected territory before delivery of an FDD. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  An arbitration of a dispute relating to a franchise located in B.C. must be heard in B.C. court, according to B.C. rules. Any provision(s) to the contrary in a franchise agreement will be void.

·  “Substantial compliance”: a technical defect in an FDD or statement of material change (SMC) that is not substantive will not bring the FDD or SMC into non-compliance provided the FDD or SMC substantially complies with the act. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  A unique definition of “earnings projection” is included in the regulations for the guidance of franchisors whose FDDs will make such a projection.

·  In addition to requiring a franchisor to attach to its FDDs copies of any guarantee and/or security agreement it will require the franchisee to sign, the regulations call upon the franchisor to disclose its “policies and practices” regarding such requirement(s). This is a requirement unique to B.C.

·  While an FDD must disclose all federal and provincial licensing and registration requirements for the franchised business to be met by the franchisee, with respect to municipal requirements, it only needs to state that the franchisee should make its own inquiries.

·  As an exception to the general “non-waiver” rule above, a franchisee may give an enforceable release in connection with settlement of a dispute with the franchisor.

B.C. case law still to be developed

B.C. will need to develop its own body of franchise case law as and when litigation arises under the new legislation. For an initial period after implementation, the B.C. courts are likely to be strongly influenced by the large body of franchise case law of the province of Ontario, as it has developed over the past 16 years since the Arthur Wishart Act (Franchise Disclosure, 2000) became law there. In many ways, Ontario case law favours franchisees; the Ontario Court of Appeal has stated that “the [Ontario] Act is designed to protect franchisees and is to be given a broad interpretation in that regard.” Ontario courts and courts of the other regulated provinces have deemed franchise legislation to be akin to “consumer protection legislation” with the franchisee seen as the consumer.

However, when it comes to arbitration of a franchise dispute, only the B.C. legislation requires the arbitration to be heard in B.C., applying the B.C. law of arbitration, despite any franchise agreement provision to the contrary.

The B.C. advantage

Six of the 10 provinces of Canada now have franchise legislation. B.C. has taken advantage of being the sixth in considering adoption of, changes to and additions to legislation already existing in the other regulated provinces before enacting the B.C. Franchises Act and regulations, which may now be the most progressive legislation in the field of franchising in Canada.

John L. Rogers is a franchise lawyer with Clark Wilson LLP in Vancouver. He practised franchise law for eight years in Toronto, where he became familiar with franchise legislation in Ontario and four other regulated provinces. He has prepared numerous franchise disclosure documents for various provinces. Contact him at 604-891-7758 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Join B.C.'s New Franchise Legislation -- Time to Comply panel discussion on November 30, 2016 to learn how to navigate the new rules taking effect. Are you prepared? For more information, visit www.biv.com/timetocomply .

A Franchises Act and regulations for B.C. have recently been finalized by the provincial government and will come into force on February 1, 2017.

In the meantime, franchisors who operate or intend to operate franchises in B.C. will have time to amend or prepare franchise agreements and franchise disclosure documents (FDDs) that comply with the new requirements.

An FDD must be delivered to every prospective or renewing B.C. franchisee from and after February 1, 2017.

What’s not new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation has many features of the franchise legislation already enacted in the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. These similar features include:

·  All franchises (to be) located in B.C. will be bound by its franchise legislation.

·  Every prospective or renewing franchisee must receive an FDD at least 14 days before signing an initial or renewal franchise agreement (assuming the renewal franchise agreement has any material change to the original document, which is usually the case).

·  If an FDD is not delivered, the franchisee has two years to rescind (terminate) the franchise agreement and receive a return of monies paid under it and potential damages. If an FDD is delivered but has defects, the franchisee has 60 days to rescind. For serious defects, some courts may extend the rescission period to the full two years.

·  In the performance and enforcement of a franchise agreement, the franchisor and franchisee are bound by duties of fair dealing and good faith to each other, in accordance with reasonable commercial standards.

·  Any claim regarding a franchise located in B.C. must be heard by a B.C. court (for example, for a serious misrepresentation made in an FDD or breach of the statutory duty of fair dealing or good faith).

·  A franchisee may not waive any right given to it by the legislation or performance of any obligation of the franchisor under the legislation.

What is new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation does have a number of important features that differ from legislation in all or some of the other provinces. These differences include:

·  The legislation will bind franchises existing in B.C. from February 1, 2017 (no “grandfathering” out of existing franchises, as in other provinces).

·  A wraparound FDD covering all or some of the other provinces bound by franchise legislation may be used, provided it is amended to cover the requirements of the B.C. legislation, including deletion of anything contrary to such legislation.

·  FDDs may be delivered in a broad number of ways: personally, by email or by prepaid courier.

·  A franchisor may require of a prospective franchisee a refundable deposit of up to 20% of the initial franchise fee, a confidentiality agreement and/or an agreement selecting a location and/or a protected territory before delivery of an FDD. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  An arbitration of a dispute relating to a franchise located in B.C. must be heard in B.C. court, according to B.C. rules. Any provision(s) to the contrary in a franchise agreement will be void.

·  “Substantial compliance”: a technical defect in an FDD or statement of material change (SMC) that is not substantive will not bring the FDD or SMC into non-compliance provided the FDD or SMC substantially complies with the act. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  A unique definition of “earnings projection” is included in the regulations for the guidance of franchisors whose FDDs will make such a projection.

·  In addition to requiring a franchisor to attach to its FDDs copies of any guarantee and/or security agreement it will require the franchisee to sign, the regulations call upon the franchisor to disclose its “policies and practices” regarding such requirement(s). This is a requirement unique to B.C.

·  While an FDD must disclose all federal and provincial licensing and registration requirements for the franchised business to be met by the franchisee, with respect to municipal requirements, it only needs to state that the franchisee should make its own inquiries.

·  As an exception to the general “non-waiver” rule above, a franchisee may give an enforceable release in connection with settlement of a dispute with the franchisor.

B.C. case law still to be developed

B.C. will need to develop its own body of franchise case law as and when litigation arises under the new legislation. For an initial period after implementation, the B.C. courts are likely to be strongly influenced by the large body of franchise case law of the province of Ontario, as it has developed over the past 16 years since the Arthur Wishart Act (Franchise Disclosure, 2000) became law there. In many ways, Ontario case law favours franchisees; the Ontario Court of Appeal has stated that “the [Ontario] Act is designed to protect franchisees and is to be given a broad interpretation in that regard.” Ontario courts and courts of the other regulated provinces have deemed franchise legislation to be akin to “consumer protection legislation” with the franchisee seen as the consumer.

However, when it comes to arbitration of a franchise dispute, only the B.C. legislation requires the arbitration to be heard in B.C., applying the B.C. law of arbitration, despite any franchise agreement provision to the contrary.

The B.C. advantage

Six of the 10 provinces of Canada now have franchise legislation. B.C. has taken advantage of being the sixth in considering adoption of, changes to and additions to legislation already existing in the other regulated provinces before enacting the B.C. Franchises Act and regulations, which may now be the most progressive legislation in the field of franchising in Canada.

John L. Rogers is a franchise lawyer with Clark Wilson LLP in Vancouver. He practised franchise law for eight years in Toronto, where he became familiar with franchise legislation in Ontario and four other regulated provinces. He has prepared numerous franchise disclosure documents for various provinces. Contact him at 604-891-7758 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Join B.C.'s New Franchise Legislation -- Time to Comply panel discussion on November 30, 2016 to learn how to navigate the new rules taking effect. Are you prepared? For more information, visit www.biv.com/timetocomply .

A Franchises Act and regulations for B.C. have recently been finalized by the provincial government and will come into force on February 1, 2017.

In the meantime, franchisors who operate or intend to operate franchises in B.C. will have time to amend or prepare franchise agreements and franchise disclosure documents (FDDs) that comply with the new requirements.

An FDD must be delivered to every prospective or renewing B.C. franchisee from and after February 1, 2017.

What’s not new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation has many features of the franchise legislation already enacted in the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. These similar features include:

·  All franchises (to be) located in B.C. will be bound by its franchise legislation.

·  Every prospective or renewing franchisee must receive an FDD at least 14 days before signing an initial or renewal franchise agreement (assuming the renewal franchise agreement has any material change to the original document, which is usually the case).

·  If an FDD is not delivered, the franchisee has two years to rescind (terminate) the franchise agreement and receive a return of monies paid under it and potential damages. If an FDD is delivered but has defects, the franchisee has 60 days to rescind. For serious defects, some courts may extend the rescission period to the full two years.

·  In the performance and enforcement of a franchise agreement, the franchisor and franchisee are bound by duties of fair dealing and good faith to each other, in accordance with reasonable commercial standards.

·  Any claim regarding a franchise located in B.C. must be heard by a B.C. court (for example, for a serious misrepresentation made in an FDD or breach of the statutory duty of fair dealing or good faith).

·  A franchisee may not waive any right given to it by the legislation or performance of any obligation of the franchisor under the legislation.

What is new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation does have a number of important features that differ from legislation in all or some of the other provinces. These differences include:

·  The legislation will bind franchises existing in B.C. from February 1, 2017 (no “grandfathering” out of existing franchises, as in other provinces).

·  A wraparound FDD covering all or some of the other provinces bound by franchise legislation may be used, provided it is amended to cover the requirements of the B.C. legislation, including deletion of anything contrary to such legislation.

·  FDDs may be delivered in a broad number of ways: personally, by email or by prepaid courier.

·  A franchisor may require of a prospective franchisee a refundable deposit of up to 20% of the initial franchise fee, a confidentiality agreement and/or an agreement selecting a location and/or a protected territory before delivery of an FDD. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  An arbitration of a dispute relating to a franchise located in B.C. must be heard in B.C. court, according to B.C. rules. Any provision(s) to the contrary in a franchise agreement will be void.

·  “Substantial compliance”: a technical defect in an FDD or statement of material change (SMC) that is not substantive will not bring the FDD or SMC into non-compliance provided the FDD or SMC substantially complies with the act. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  A unique definition of “earnings projection” is included in the regulations for the guidance of franchisors whose FDDs will make such a projection.

·  In addition to requiring a franchisor to attach to its FDDs copies of any guarantee and/or security agreement it will require the franchisee to sign, the regulations call upon the franchisor to disclose its “policies and practices” regarding such requirement(s). This is a requirement unique to B.C.

·  While an FDD must disclose all federal and provincial licensing and registration requirements for the franchised business to be met by the franchisee, with respect to municipal requirements, it only needs to state that the franchisee should make its own inquiries.

·  As an exception to the general “non-waiver” rule above, a franchisee may give an enforceable release in connection with settlement of a dispute with the franchisor.

B.C. case law still to be developed

B.C. will need to develop its own body of franchise case law as and when litigation arises under the new legislation. For an initial period after implementation, the B.C. courts are likely to be strongly influenced by the large body of franchise case law of the province of Ontario, as it has developed over the past 16 years since the Arthur Wishart Act (Franchise Disclosure, 2000) became law there. In many ways, Ontario case law favours franchisees; the Ontario Court of Appeal has stated that “the [Ontario] Act is designed to protect franchisees and is to be given a broad interpretation in that regard.” Ontario courts and courts of the other regulated provinces have deemed franchise legislation to be akin to “consumer protection legislation” with the franchisee seen as the consumer.

However, when it comes to arbitration of a franchise dispute, only the B.C. legislation requires the arbitration to be heard in B.C., applying the B.C. law of arbitration, despite any franchise agreement provision to the contrary.

The B.C. advantage

Six of the 10 provinces of Canada now have franchise legislation. B.C. has taken advantage of being the sixth in considering adoption of, changes to and additions to legislation already existing in the other regulated provinces before enacting the B.C. Franchises Act and regulations, which may now be the most progressive legislation in the field of franchising in Canada.

John L. Rogers is a franchise lawyer with Clark Wilson LLP in Vancouver. He practised franchise law for eight years in Toronto, where he became familiar with franchise legislation in Ontario and four other regulated provinces. He has prepared numerous franchise disclosure documents for various provinces. Contact him at 604-891-7758 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Join B.C.'s New Franchise Legislation -- Time to Comply panel discussion on November 30, 2016 to learn how to navigate the new rules taking effect. Are you prepared? For more information, visit www.biv.com/timetocomply .

Franchise Regs change in BC

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A Franchises Act and regulations for B.C. have recently been finalized by the provincial government and will come into force on February 1, 2017.

In the meantime, franchisors who operate or intend to operate franchises in B.C. will have time to amend or prepare franchise agreements and franchise disclosure documents (FDDs) that comply with the new requirements.

An FDD must be delivered to every prospective or renewing B.C. franchisee from and after February 1, 2017.

What’s not new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation has many features of the franchise legislation already enacted in the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. These similar features include:

·  All franchises (to be) located in B.C. will be bound by its franchise legislation.

·  Every prospective or renewing franchisee must receive an FDD at least 14 days before signing an initial or renewal franchise agreement (assuming the renewal franchise agreement has any material change to the original document, which is usually the case).

·  If an FDD is not delivered, the franchisee has two years to rescind (terminate) the franchise agreement and receive a return of monies paid under it and potential damages. If an FDD is delivered but has defects, the franchisee has 60 days to rescind. For serious defects, some courts may extend the rescission period to the full two years.

·  In the performance and enforcement of a franchise agreement, the franchisor and franchisee are bound by duties of fair dealing and good faith to each other, in accordance with reasonable commercial standards.

·  Any claim regarding a franchise located in B.C. must be heard by a B.C. court (for example, for a serious misrepresentation made in an FDD or breach of the statutory duty of fair dealing or good faith).

·  A franchisee may not waive any right given to it by the legislation or performance of any obligation of the franchisor under the legislation.

What is new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation does have a number of important features that differ from legislation in all or some of the other provinces. These differences include:

·  The legislation will bind franchises existing in B.C. from February 1, 2017 (no “grandfathering” out of existing franchises, as in other provinces).

·  A wraparound FDD covering all or some of the other provinces bound by franchise legislation may be used, provided it is amended to cover the requirements of the B.C. legislation, including deletion of anything contrary to such legislation.

·  FDDs may be delivered in a broad number of ways: personally, by email or by prepaid courier.

·  A franchisor may require of a prospective franchisee a refundable deposit of up to 20% of the initial franchise fee, a confidentiality agreement and/or an agreement selecting a location and/or a protected territory before delivery of an FDD. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  An arbitration of a dispute relating to a franchise located in B.C. must be heard in B.C. court, according to B.C. rules. Any provision(s) to the contrary in a franchise agreement will be void.

·  “Substantial compliance”: a technical defect in an FDD or statement of material change (SMC) that is not substantive will not bring the FDD or SMC into non-compliance provided the FDD or SMC substantially complies with the act. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  A unique definition of “earnings projection” is included in the regulations for the guidance of franchisors whose FDDs will make such a projection.

·  In addition to requiring a franchisor to attach to its FDDs copies of any guarantee and/or security agreement it will require the franchisee to sign, the regulations call upon the franchisor to disclose its “policies and practices” regarding such requirement(s). This is a requirement unique to B.C.

·  While an FDD must disclose all federal and provincial licensing and registration requirements for the franchised business to be met by the franchisee, with respect to municipal requirements, it only needs to state that the franchisee should make its own inquiries.

·  As an exception to the general “non-waiver” rule above, a franchisee may give an enforceable release in connection with settlement of a dispute with the franchisor.

B.C. case law still to be developed

B.C. will need to develop its own body of franchise case law as and when litigation arises under the new legislation. For an initial period after implementation, the B.C. courts are likely to be strongly influenced by the large body of franchise case law of the province of Ontario, as it has developed over the past 16 years since the Arthur Wishart Act (Franchise Disclosure, 2000) became law there. In many ways, Ontario case law favours franchisees; the Ontario Court of Appeal has stated that “the [Ontario] Act is designed to protect franchisees and is to be given a broad interpretation in that regard.” Ontario courts and courts of the other regulated provinces have deemed franchise legislation to be akin to “consumer protection legislation” with the franchisee seen as the consumer.

However, when it comes to arbitration of a franchise dispute, only the B.C. legislation requires the arbitration to be heard in B.C., applying the B.C. law of arbitration, despite any franchise agreement provision to the contrary.

The B.C. advantage

Six of the 10 provinces of Canada now have franchise legislation. B.C. has taken advantage of being the sixth in considering adoption of, changes to and additions to legislation already existing in the other regulated provinces before enacting the B.C. Franchises Act and regulations, which may now be the most progressive legislation in the field of franchising in Canada.

John L. Rogers is a franchise lawyer with Clark Wilson LLP in Vancouver. He practised franchise law for eight years in Toronto, where he became familiar with franchise legislation in Ontario and four other regulated provinces. He has prepared numerous franchise disclosure documents for various provinces. Contact him at 604-891-7758 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Join B.C.'s New Franchise Legislation -- Time to Comply panel discussion on November 30, 2016 to learn how to navigate the new rules taking effect. Are you prepared? For more information, visit www.biv.com/timetocomply .

A Franchises Act and regulations for B.C. have recently been finalized by the provincial government and will come into force on February 1, 2017.

In the meantime, franchisors who operate or intend to operate franchises in B.C. will have time to amend or prepare franchise agreements and franchise disclosure documents (FDDs) that comply with the new requirements.

An FDD must be delivered to every prospective or renewing B.C. franchisee from and after February 1, 2017.

What’s not new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation has many features of the franchise legislation already enacted in the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. These similar features include:

·  All franchises (to be) located in B.C. will be bound by its franchise legislation.

·  Every prospective or renewing franchisee must receive an FDD at least 14 days before signing an initial or renewal franchise agreement (assuming the renewal franchise agreement has any material change to the original document, which is usually the case).

·  If an FDD is not delivered, the franchisee has two years to rescind (terminate) the franchise agreement and receive a return of monies paid under it and potential damages. If an FDD is delivered but has defects, the franchisee has 60 days to rescind. For serious defects, some courts may extend the rescission period to the full two years.

·  In the performance and enforcement of a franchise agreement, the franchisor and franchisee are bound by duties of fair dealing and good faith to each other, in accordance with reasonable commercial standards.

·  Any claim regarding a franchise located in B.C. must be heard by a B.C. court (for example, for a serious misrepresentation made in an FDD or breach of the statutory duty of fair dealing or good faith).

·  A franchisee may not waive any right given to it by the legislation or performance of any obligation of the franchisor under the legislation.

What is new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation does have a number of important features that differ from legislation in all or some of the other provinces. These differences include:

·  The legislation will bind franchises existing in B.C. from February 1, 2017 (no “grandfathering” out of existing franchises, as in other provinces).

·  A wraparound FDD covering all or some of the other provinces bound by franchise legislation may be used, provided it is amended to cover the requirements of the B.C. legislation, including deletion of anything contrary to such legislation.

·  FDDs may be delivered in a broad number of ways: personally, by email or by prepaid courier.

·  A franchisor may require of a prospective franchisee a refundable deposit of up to 20% of the initial franchise fee, a confidentiality agreement and/or an agreement selecting a location and/or a protected territory before delivery of an FDD. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  An arbitration of a dispute relating to a franchise located in B.C. must be heard in B.C. court, according to B.C. rules. Any provision(s) to the contrary in a franchise agreement will be void.

·  “Substantial compliance”: a technical defect in an FDD or statement of material change (SMC) that is not substantive will not bring the FDD or SMC into non-compliance provided the FDD or SMC substantially complies with the act. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  A unique definition of “earnings projection” is included in the regulations for the guidance of franchisors whose FDDs will make such a projection.

·  In addition to requiring a franchisor to attach to its FDDs copies of any guarantee and/or security agreement it will require the franchisee to sign, the regulations call upon the franchisor to disclose its “policies and practices” regarding such requirement(s). This is a requirement unique to B.C.

·  While an FDD must disclose all federal and provincial licensing and registration requirements for the franchised business to be met by the franchisee, with respect to municipal requirements, it only needs to state that the franchisee should make its own inquiries.

·  As an exception to the general “non-waiver” rule above, a franchisee may give an enforceable release in connection with settlement of a dispute with the franchisor.

B.C. case law still to be developed

B.C. will need to develop its own body of franchise case law as and when litigation arises under the new legislation. For an initial period after implementation, the B.C. courts are likely to be strongly influenced by the large body of franchise case law of the province of Ontario, as it has developed over the past 16 years since the Arthur Wishart Act (Franchise Disclosure, 2000) became law there. In many ways, Ontario case law favours franchisees; the Ontario Court of Appeal has stated that “the [Ontario] Act is designed to protect franchisees and is to be given a broad interpretation in that regard.” Ontario courts and courts of the other regulated provinces have deemed franchise legislation to be akin to “consumer protection legislation” with the franchisee seen as the consumer.

However, when it comes to arbitration of a franchise dispute, only the B.C. legislation requires the arbitration to be heard in B.C., applying the B.C. law of arbitration, despite any franchise agreement provision to the contrary.

The B.C. advantage

Six of the 10 provinces of Canada now have franchise legislation. B.C. has taken advantage of being the sixth in considering adoption of, changes to and additions to legislation already existing in the other regulated provinces before enacting the B.C. Franchises Act and regulations, which may now be the most progressive legislation in the field of franchising in Canada.

John L. Rogers is a franchise lawyer with Clark Wilson LLP in Vancouver. He practised franchise law for eight years in Toronto, where he became familiar with franchise legislation in Ontario and four other regulated provinces. He has prepared numerous franchise disclosure documents for various provinces. Contact him at 604-891-7758 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Join B.C.'s New Franchise Legislation -- Time to Comply panel discussion on November 30, 2016 to learn how to navigate the new rules taking effect. Are you prepared? For more information, visit www.biv.com/timetocomply .

A Franchises Act and regulations for B.C. have recently been finalized by the provincial government and will come into force on February 1, 2017.

In the meantime, franchisors who operate or intend to operate franchises in B.C. will have time to amend or prepare franchise agreements and franchise disclosure documents (FDDs) that comply with the new requirements.

An FDD must be delivered to every prospective or renewing B.C. franchisee from and after February 1, 2017.

What’s not new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation has many features of the franchise legislation already enacted in the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. These similar features include:

·  All franchises (to be) located in B.C. will be bound by its franchise legislation.

·  Every prospective or renewing franchisee must receive an FDD at least 14 days before signing an initial or renewal franchise agreement (assuming the renewal franchise agreement has any material change to the original document, which is usually the case).

·  If an FDD is not delivered, the franchisee has two years to rescind (terminate) the franchise agreement and receive a return of monies paid under it and potential damages. If an FDD is delivered but has defects, the franchisee has 60 days to rescind. For serious defects, some courts may extend the rescission period to the full two years.

·  In the performance and enforcement of a franchise agreement, the franchisor and franchisee are bound by duties of fair dealing and good faith to each other, in accordance with reasonable commercial standards.

·  Any claim regarding a franchise located in B.C. must be heard by a B.C. court (for example, for a serious misrepresentation made in an FDD or breach of the statutory duty of fair dealing or good faith).

·  A franchisee may not waive any right given to it by the legislation or performance of any obligation of the franchisor under the legislation.

What is new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation does have a number of important features that differ from legislation in all or some of the other provinces. These differences include:

·  The legislation will bind franchises existing in B.C. from February 1, 2017 (no “grandfathering” out of existing franchises, as in other provinces).

·  A wraparound FDD covering all or some of the other provinces bound by franchise legislation may be used, provided it is amended to cover the requirements of the B.C. legislation, including deletion of anything contrary to such legislation.

·  FDDs may be delivered in a broad number of ways: personally, by email or by prepaid courier.

·  A franchisor may require of a prospective franchisee a refundable deposit of up to 20% of the initial franchise fee, a confidentiality agreement and/or an agreement selecting a location and/or a protected territory before delivery of an FDD. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  An arbitration of a dispute relating to a franchise located in B.C. must be heard in B.C. court, according to B.C. rules. Any provision(s) to the contrary in a franchise agreement will be void.

·  “Substantial compliance”: a technical defect in an FDD or statement of material change (SMC) that is not substantive will not bring the FDD or SMC into non-compliance provided the FDD or SMC substantially complies with the act. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  A unique definition of “earnings projection” is included in the regulations for the guidance of franchisors whose FDDs will make such a projection.

·  In addition to requiring a franchisor to attach to its FDDs copies of any guarantee and/or security agreement it will require the franchisee to sign, the regulations call upon the franchisor to disclose its “policies and practices” regarding such requirement(s). This is a requirement unique to B.C.

·  While an FDD must disclose all federal and provincial licensing and registration requirements for the franchised business to be met by the franchisee, with respect to municipal requirements, it only needs to state that the franchisee should make its own inquiries.

·  As an exception to the general “non-waiver” rule above, a franchisee may give an enforceable release in connection with settlement of a dispute with the franchisor.

B.C. case law still to be developed

B.C. will need to develop its own body of franchise case law as and when litigation arises under the new legislation. For an initial period after implementation, the B.C. courts are likely to be strongly influenced by the large body of franchise case law of the province of Ontario, as it has developed over the past 16 years since the Arthur Wishart Act (Franchise Disclosure, 2000) became law there. In many ways, Ontario case law favours franchisees; the Ontario Court of Appeal has stated that “the [Ontario] Act is designed to protect franchisees and is to be given a broad interpretation in that regard.” Ontario courts and courts of the other regulated provinces have deemed franchise legislation to be akin to “consumer protection legislation” with the franchisee seen as the consumer.

However, when it comes to arbitration of a franchise dispute, only the B.C. legislation requires the arbitration to be heard in B.C., applying the B.C. law of arbitration, despite any franchise agreement provision to the contrary.

The B.C. advantage

Six of the 10 provinces of Canada now have franchise legislation. B.C. has taken advantage of being the sixth in considering adoption of, changes to and additions to legislation already existing in the other regulated provinces before enacting the B.C. Franchises Act and regulations, which may now be the most progressive legislation in the field of franchising in Canada.

John L. Rogers is a franchise lawyer with Clark Wilson LLP in Vancouver. He practised franchise law for eight years in Toronto, where he became familiar with franchise legislation in Ontario and four other regulated provinces. He has prepared numerous franchise disclosure documents for various provinces. Contact him at 604-891-7758 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Join B.C.'s New Franchise Legislation -- Time to Comply panel discussion on November 30, 2016 to learn how to navigate the new rules taking effect. Are you prepared? For more information, visit www.biv.com/timetocomply .

A Franchises Act and regulations for B.C. have recently been finalized by the provincial government and will come into force on February 1, 2017.

In the meantime, franchisors who operate or intend to operate franchises in B.C. will have time to amend or prepare franchise agreements and franchise disclosure documents (FDDs) that comply with the new requirements.

An FDD must be delivered to every prospective or renewing B.C. franchisee from and after February 1, 2017.

What’s not new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation has many features of the franchise legislation already enacted in the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. These similar features include:

·  All franchises (to be) located in B.C. will be bound by its franchise legislation.

·  Every prospective or renewing franchisee must receive an FDD at least 14 days before signing an initial or renewal franchise agreement (assuming the renewal franchise agreement has any material change to the original document, which is usually the case).

·  If an FDD is not delivered, the franchisee has two years to rescind (terminate) the franchise agreement and receive a return of monies paid under it and potential damages. If an FDD is delivered but has defects, the franchisee has 60 days to rescind. For serious defects, some courts may extend the rescission period to the full two years.

·  In the performance and enforcement of a franchise agreement, the franchisor and franchisee are bound by duties of fair dealing and good faith to each other, in accordance with reasonable commercial standards.

·  Any claim regarding a franchise located in B.C. must be heard by a B.C. court (for example, for a serious misrepresentation made in an FDD or breach of the statutory duty of fair dealing or good faith).

·  A franchisee may not waive any right given to it by the legislation or performance of any obligation of the franchisor under the legislation.

What is new about B.C.’s legislation

The B.C. legislation does have a number of important features that differ from legislation in all or some of the other provinces. These differences include:

·  The legislation will bind franchises existing in B.C. from February 1, 2017 (no “grandfathering” out of existing franchises, as in other provinces).

·  A wraparound FDD covering all or some of the other provinces bound by franchise legislation may be used, provided it is amended to cover the requirements of the B.C. legislation, including deletion of anything contrary to such legislation.

·  FDDs may be delivered in a broad number of ways: personally, by email or by prepaid courier.

·  A franchisor may require of a prospective franchisee a refundable deposit of up to 20% of the initial franchise fee, a confidentiality agreement and/or an agreement selecting a location and/or a protected territory before delivery of an FDD. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  An arbitration of a dispute relating to a franchise located in B.C. must be heard in B.C. court, according to B.C. rules. Any provision(s) to the contrary in a franchise agreement will be void.

·  “Substantial compliance”: a technical defect in an FDD or statement of material change (SMC) that is not substantive will not bring the FDD or SMC into non-compliance provided the FDD or SMC substantially complies with the act. Some of the other provinces have similar provisions.

·  A unique definition of “earnings projection” is included in the regulations for the guidance of franchisors whose FDDs will make such a projection.

·  In addition to requiring a franchisor to attach to its FDDs copies of any guarantee and/or security agreement it will require the franchisee to sign, the regulations call upon the franchisor to disclose its “policies and practices” regarding such requirement(s). This is a requirement unique to B.C.

·  While an FDD must disclose all federal and provincial licensing and registration requirements for the franchised business to be met by the franchisee, with respect to municipal requirements, it only needs to state that the franchisee should make its own inquiries.

·  As an exception to the general “non-waiver” rule above, a franchisee may give an enforceable release in connection with settlement of a dispute with the franchisor.

B.C. case law still to be developed

B.C. will need to develop its own body of franchise case law as and when litigation arises under the new legislation. For an initial period after implementation, the B.C. courts are likely to be strongly influenced by the large body of franchise case law of the province of Ontario, as it has developed over the past 16 years since the Arthur Wishart Act (Franchise Disclosure, 2000) became law there. In many ways, Ontario case law favours franchisees; the Ontario Court of Appeal has stated that “the [Ontario] Act is designed to protect franchisees and is to be given a broad interpretation in that regard.” Ontario courts and courts of the other regulated provinces have deemed franchise legislation to be akin to “consumer protection legislation” with the franchisee seen as the consumer.

However, when it comes to arbitration of a franchise dispute, only the B.C. legislation requires the arbitration to be heard in B.C., applying the B.C. law of arbitration, despite any franchise agreement provision to the contrary.

The B.C. advantage

Six of the 10 provinces of Canada now have franchise legislation. B.C. has taken advantage of being the sixth in considering adoption of, changes to and additions to legislation already existing in the other regulated provinces before enacting the B.C. Franchises Act and regulations, which may now be the most progressive legislation in the field of franchising in Canada.

John L. Rogers is a franchise lawyer with Clark Wilson LLP in Vancouver. He practised franchise law for eight years in Toronto, where he became familiar with franchise legislation in Ontario and four other regulated provinces. He has prepared numerous franchise disclosure documents for various provinces. Contact him at 604-891-7758 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Join B.C.'s New Franchise Legislation -- Time to Comply panel discussion on November 30, 2016 to learn how to navigate the new rules taking effect. Are you prepared? For more information, visit www.biv.com/timetocomply .

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